The importance of being motile and the mathematics of microswimming

Event


Date:

Time: 6:00pm

University of Glasgow

New Mathematics and Statistics building, University Place, Glasgow, G12 8QS, Scotland

Organiser: Helen Stimpson (branch secretary)

Organiser Email: ima.scotland1@gmail.com

Thursday November 2, 2017 6:00pm Thursday November 2, 2017 6:00pm Europe/London The importance of being motile and the mathematics of microswimming University of GlasgowNew Mathematics and Statistics building, University PlaceGlasgowG12 8QSScotland The importance of being motile and the mathematics of microswimming, a talk by Dr Kirsty Wan (University of Exeter) Abstract […] Event Link: https://ima.org.uk/7175/importance-motile-mathematics-microswimming/ Helen Stimpson (branch secretary) ima.scotland1@gmail.com

The importance of being motile and the mathematics of microswimming


The importance of being motile and the mathematics of microswimming, a talk by Dr Kirsty Wan (University of Exeter)

Abstract

Since the invention of the microscope, scientists have known that pond-dwelling algae can actually swim – powering their way through the fluid at several times their own body size per second using tiny limbs called cilia and flagella.  Only recently has it become clear that these tiny structures are the very same cilia that drive many important physiological and developmental processes within the human body.  Motivated by this connection, we shall explore flagella-mediated swimming gaits in diverse species of algae, and demonstrate how mathematical theory can provide the key to differentiating between different behaviours.  Stochastic bifurcations between different modes of swimming are visualised at high spatiotemporal resolution, and dynamic changes in flagellar beating shown to elicit trajectory reorientation and responsive navigation in these primitive microorganisms.

No charge is made to attend meetings and non-members are welcome.

Image credit: P13a_019_canaux efférents épididyme_efferent ductules epididymis_Scyliorhinus canicula by Franck Genten / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
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